Dating currier amp ives prints best intro lines for dating

Currier & Ives made the famous American lithographs marked with their name from 1857 to 1907. Many reprints of the Currier or Currier & Ives prints have been made.The mark used on the print included the street address in New York City, and it is possible to date the year of the original issue from this information. The Currier & Ives name appeared on all the prints; so if it does not appear on yours, it is either a copy or a trimmed print—both of which are less valuable than untrimmed originals.The 19th-century Victorian public was receptive to the firm's products, with its interest in current events and sentimental taste.Currier and Ives prints were among the most popular wall hangings of the day.Biography: Currier and Ives was a successful American printmaking firm headed by Nathaniel Currier (1813–1888) and James Merritt Ives (1824–1895) based in New York City from 1834 to 1907.The prolific firm produced prints from paintings by fine artists as black and white lithographs that were hand colored.Lithographic prints could be reproduced quickly and purchased inexpensively, and the firm called itself "the Grand Central Depot for Cheap and Popular Prints" and advertised its lithographs as "colored engravings for the people".

Currier realized that there was a market for current news, so he turned out several more disaster prints and other inexpensive lithographs that illustrated local and national events, such as "Ruins of the Planter's Hotel, New Orleans, which fell at two O’clock on the Morning of May 15, 1835, burying 50 persons, 40 of whom Escaped with their Lives".[3] He quickly gained a reputation as an accomplished lithographer.[4] In 1840, he produced "Awful Conflagration of the Steam Boat Lexington", which was so successful that he was given a weekly insert in the New York Sun.Ives also helped Currier interview potential artists and craftsmen.He had a flair for gauging popular interests and aided in selecting the images that the firm would publish and expanding the firm's range to include political satire and sentimental scenes, such as sleigh rides in the country and steamboat races. The firm The firm Currier and Ives described itself as "Publishers of Cheap and Popular Prints".From 1866 on, the firm occupied three floors in a building at 33 Spruce Street in New York: Small works sold for five to twenty cents each, and large works sold for

Currier realized that there was a market for current news, so he turned out several more disaster prints and other inexpensive lithographs that illustrated local and national events, such as "Ruins of the Planter's Hotel, New Orleans, which fell at two O’clock on the Morning of May 15, 1835, burying 50 persons, 40 of whom Escaped with their Lives".[3] He quickly gained a reputation as an accomplished lithographer.[4] In 1840, he produced "Awful Conflagration of the Steam Boat Lexington", which was so successful that he was given a weekly insert in the New York Sun.

Ives also helped Currier interview potential artists and craftsmen.

He had a flair for gauging popular interests and aided in selecting the images that the firm would publish and expanding the firm's range to include political satire and sentimental scenes, such as sleigh rides in the country and steamboat races. The firm The firm Currier and Ives described itself as "Publishers of Cheap and Popular Prints".

From 1866 on, the firm occupied three floors in a building at 33 Spruce Street in New York: Small works sold for five to twenty cents each, and large works sold for $1 to $3 apiece.

The Currier and Ives firm branched out from its central shop in New York City to sell prints via pushcart vendors, peddlers, and book stores.

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Currier realized that there was a market for current news, so he turned out several more disaster prints and other inexpensive lithographs that illustrated local and national events, such as "Ruins of the Planter's Hotel, New Orleans, which fell at two O’clock on the Morning of May 15, 1835, burying 50 persons, 40 of whom Escaped with their Lives".[3] He quickly gained a reputation as an accomplished lithographer.[4] In 1840, he produced "Awful Conflagration of the Steam Boat Lexington", which was so successful that he was given a weekly insert in the New York Sun.Ives also helped Currier interview potential artists and craftsmen.He had a flair for gauging popular interests and aided in selecting the images that the firm would publish and expanding the firm's range to include political satire and sentimental scenes, such as sleigh rides in the country and steamboat races. The firm The firm Currier and Ives described itself as "Publishers of Cheap and Popular Prints".From 1866 on, the firm occupied three floors in a building at 33 Spruce Street in New York: Small works sold for five to twenty cents each, and large works sold for $1 to $3 apiece.The Currier and Ives firm branched out from its central shop in New York City to sell prints via pushcart vendors, peddlers, and book stores.

to apiece.The Currier and Ives firm branched out from its central shop in New York City to sell prints via pushcart vendors, peddlers, and book stores.

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Tragedy struck when Nathaniel was eight years old, when his father unexpectedly died, leaving Nathaniel and his eleven-year-old brother Lorenzo to provide for the family: six-year-old sister Elizabeth and two-year-old brother Charles, as well as their mother. Brown, a noted engraver and printer.[3] Currier's early lithographs were issued under the name of Stodart & Currier, a result of the partnership that he created in 1834 with a local New York printmaker named Stodart.

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